A Long Time ESOP Company is Becoming 100% Employee Owned

Back in 2011 EBI watched with interest as EllisDon, a long-time ESOP company, took the recession in stride as one of Canada’s Top 100 Employers for 2012. In The Globe and Mail article, the firm’s vice-president of leadership and entrepreneurial development shared that in the previous year, 84 percent of employees who were offered shares accepted, an increase from the usual rate of around 70% — because they believed in the ESOP and the company. Our president, Perry Phillips, told the Globe and Mail “the employees who are engaged as owners will now do whatever it takes to get that company through tough times. I’ve seen this constantly. A lot of companies survive downturns and come back up very quickly because they’re still around, thanks to their employees.” 

We can expect the same resilience from ESOP companies today as we all get back to work. Finally.

Now, 9 years later in the midst of a global crisis, Canada’s EllisDon announced recently that a final agreement was executed under which 100 per cent of the company’s equity will be transferred to the company’s employees.

Electrical Business Magazine reported that the majority shareholder, Smith family shareholders, have signed off on an agreement to allow the company to be 100 percent employee-owned over a specified period of time.

The company’s Board of Directors chair, Gerald Slemko, the Smith family, and representation from EllisDon’s shareholder employees were the parties driving this agreement forward. EllisDon will continue to be governed by an independent Board of Directors.

“EllisDon’s share structure and independent governance will ensure that we continue to strive together for complete fairness in equity of ownership across all employees, both present and future,” said CEO Geoff Smith. “Shares will continue to be offered to employees every year and loans will still be offered on an interest-free basis. Shares will always be purchased and sold at book value, ensuring the ability of every employee shareholder to participate fully in the share value created while they are at EllisDon, and then to pass that opportunity on to future employees.”

 

By Joanna Phillips, CHRL, CVB, Vice President, ESOP Builders Inc.

 

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The Case for an ESOP as an Attraction and Retention Tool

The shut-down of the economy has lasted for almost 2 months and businesses are either facing negative impacts from the COVID-19 crisis, along with most Canadian businesses, or are among the minority of businesses experiencing positive impacts.

It’s likely that very difficult business decisions have had to be made to ensure your company’s existence through the crisis. Part of the challenge is having to lay off valued employees, and maintain a positive culture.

Although things are still changing rapidly, business owners are likely considering long-term impacts on the company’s ability to retain their employees, but also to attract top talent once the crisis is behind us. The many reasons why owners turn to an ESOP (Employee Share Ownership Plan) include to exit the business, to establish a succession plan, and especially to attract and retain the top talent in the industry. In some sectors ESOPs are de rigueur and companies cannot be without one. Rather than turning away from investing in your business growth now, this may be exactly the right time to take opportunities to work on your business rather than simply in it.

As your company grows and time goes on, your workforce demographics naturally become younger. It certainly seems that ESOPs appeal greatly to Millennial workers who are looking for something more out of their companies. More studies are confirming this as more millennials enter the workforce. Every business owner knows how much time it can take to put together the “perfect” team. Additionally, employees overall are not staying in one job, or one company, for long compared to in the past. For these reasons, an ESOP can be a very strategic and valuable tool to attract and retain your team which you have invested in and worked hard to establish. Many studies of ESOPs in the US conducted by the NCEO indicate that ESOP companies have a greater resilience for staying in business through economic downturns. While the current crisis is unprecedented, these studies do suggest companies who have a participative ESOP will be more likely to come out of the crisis and emerge in a relatively strong position.

In ESOP Builders’ ESOPs as an Attraction and Retention Tool (November 2019) survey of Canadian ESOP companies 75 percent of respondents indicated their ESOP offers an edge on the competition to attract and retain talent. Therefore, it is likely that taking these steps will set your company up for success against your competition by ensuring you have the team to bounce back incredibly strong once the country experiences a positive shift in the economy.

By Joanna Phillips, CHRL, CVB, Vice President, ESOP Builders Inc.


Shared Resources for the ESOP Community

Our April 2020 survey gathered responses from ESOP companies across Canada to help understand their strategies undertaken to manage operations as an ESOP during the COVIC-19 crisis.  The survey summary is illustrated below. 


The Philosophy that allows ESOPs (Employee Share Ownership Plans) to create incredibly successful companies.

First is the philosophy of personal wealth creation. Employees are motivated by financial gain and ESOPs deliver wealth.

Second is the philosophy of cultural engagement on a personal basis. The Theory of Group Wisdom holds that groups are more successful over individuals due not to the intellect of each person but due to the social interaction of the group. ESOPs create the conditions of group success through a participative culture of engagement.

The combination of personal wealth creation and social interaction create a synergy that few non-ESOP companies can match. The results are ESOP companies with higher productivity, higher profitability, more innovation, and wealthier employees.

By Perry Phillips, President and Founder of ESOP Builders Inc.

Learn more about the 2018 Canadian Employee Ownership Conference in Edmonton, AB – June 4-6.


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